Design Inspiration

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House of Vans London Opening

visualgraphc:

Cisne Negro

by

Igor Ramos

(Source: behance.net)

fitness-food-and-fandom:

So delicate Flowergirls by Lim Zhi Wei / Love Limzy, Malaysian artist.

these are amazing

(Source: vraieronique, via fastgirlsdoitwell)

itscolossal:

New Paintings on Salvaged Books by Mike Stilkey

(Source: lustik, via 1010estudiocreativo)

therhumboogie:

By Alban Guého, situated near the entrance to a hotel in France this strange, tactile installation is an abstract interpretation of an ancient Greek myth, the work is titled ‘Medusa’. The long wool fibres look so tempting to walk through under the installation, lovely stuff.

(Source: designboom.com)

visualgraphc:

An A-Z of Edible Flowers

Charlotte Day

renamonkalou:

Angawi house, Jeddah, Arabia Saudita

(via sweethomestyle)

foxmouth:

Norway; 2014 | by Atle Rønningen

(via fattyfit)

instagram:

Telling Stories through Food with @leesamantha

For more photos and videos of Samantha’s culinary artwork, follow @leesamantha on Instagram.

"When I first started creating food art, those in bento boxes (called charaben) had been around for a long time—but I was more interested in exploring food art out of the box and simplifying the technique,” says Malaysia Instagrammer Samantha Lee (@leesamantha). “Since then, I’ve developed my own unique style of storytelling on plates that explores a variety of subject matter and ingredients,” she adds.

A mother of two daughters, Samantha started devising ways to get them to eat in a healthier and more independent way by applying creativity to her presentation. She designs scenes on plates featuring celebrities, popular characters, animals and famous landmarks, made up mainly of local and fresh edible ingredients. Samantha’s ideas and creative inspiration come from a variety of fine arts as well as from her daughters, whom she describes as having “endless imagination”.

Samantha is also careful to keep food waste to a minimum. “Before I begin putting any new ideas on a plate, I sketch out my designs and write down ideas and ingredients I’ll be using. It helps me to be more organized and prevent food waste.” Her minimalistic approach shows in her camera work as well. She edits very little by choosing to shoot in natural light and avoids using too many props in her photos to “let the food art stand out and speak for itself.”

instagram:

Creating “Nezo Art” (#寝相アート) with @erichedelic

To see more photos of “nezo art,” browse the #寝相アート hashtag and follow @erichedelic on Instagram.

"The way my baby daughter slept was so funny, and I had some time to spare while she was asleep," explains Fukuoka Instagrammer Eriko Ohga (@erichedelic). In Japan, a growing trend called “nezo art” (寝相アート) has been inspiring mothers like Eriko to take creative photos of their babies while they sleep. Literally meaning “sleep-posture art” in Japanese, this new style of documenting baby years allows moms to have some fun during their few hours of peace while the little one sleeps.

The “nezo art” that creative moms like Eriko share are especially elaborate, using costumes and household props like laundry to shape scenes that tell stories. “I try to form a rough idea of the scene I want to create and prepare the area where my daughter would lay down before she falls asleep,” reveals Eriko. She then places her daughter in the designated setup, and, once the baby is asleep, the rest of the parts are put together in stealthy movements. Eriko also shares her tips for shooting the finished image: “I climb up on a chair to capture the entire scene from above. I’m also extra careful not to wake the baby up with the sound of the iPhone camera.”

theartofanimation:

Hotaka

The Scarecrow

Excelente

theartofanimation:

kemineko

theartofanimation:

Andreas Rocha

typejoy:

Teddy’s Nacho Royale

by Moniker SF